Friday, November 27, 2009

Butter in Your Food Storage


One evening at church one of the ladies mentioned that you could bottle butter and store it for 3 year. I hadn’t seen so many women interested in a comment about preserving food in a long tim. I received the instructions from her and have been bottling butter for my food storage ever since.

Items you need:

12 – 8 oz. jelly jars, lids, and rings (clean and sanitize bottle prior to bottling butter)
5–¼ pounds butter or margarine (5 pounds + 1 stick)
1 cookie sheet (optional)
1 cooling rack (optional)

Getting started:

Sterilize your jars and lids. (I wash my jars in the dishwasher on the sanitize setting and boil my lids like normal. I am into machines doing most of the work.)

Place your twelve jars on a cookie sheet. (This makes it much easier to handle the jars; instead of putting the jars in the oven and then taking them out individually.)

Preheat oven to 225°F.


Phase One:


Open up twelve sticks of butter and cut each stick into two – three tablespoons sections and one – two tablespoons section.



Drop the two – three tablespoons sections in the bottom of the jar length wise.


Then very carefully place the one – two tablespoons section in the middle on top. The butter will stick up a little above the rim.


(Do this with all twelve jars.)


Put your jars in the oven at 225°F for 15 to 20 minutes.


(If you placed your butter in the jars carefully, the butter will melt evenly down into the jar with out making any mess.)

Phase Two:


While your butter is melting in the oven, open up the remainder nine sticks of butter and cut each stick the same way you did before (two – three tablespoons sections and one – two tablespoons section).



After the butter has melted in the jar, take the jars out of the oven. I place them on a cooling rack.


Now here is where math helps. In nine of the jars drop in two – three tablespoons sections.


In three of the jars drop in three – two tablespoons sections.


(This is ¾ stick of butter in each jar.) The butter should fit easily into the jar, make sure it is slightly below the rim level.



Prior to putting on the lids, ensure that the rims are clean of any butter.



Place the lid on each jar.



Screw on the ring, finger tight. You are putting the ring on just to keep the lid in place.




Put the jars back into the oven for 45 minutes at 225°F.



The butter will separate into its solids and liquids. The solids will be the lighter opaque substance at the bottom of the jar

Take the jars out of the oven. I place them back on the cooling rack. Let the jars cool. In a couple of minutes you will here the sound of popping when the jars seal. (I love that sound.)

The Finish:



After the jars have cool down, I double check all the jars have sealed. All the lids should be concaved.




Tighten the rings on the jar and write the date on the top of the jar. The butter is good for three years.


Now You Have Butter in Your food Storage



When you open the butter you will have to stir the solids back into the liquids. If you used butter with salt, you will find the salt crystals are larger. When you eat the butter, you will be able to feel the salt crystals in your mouth. If you cook with this butter, you will not find any difference. This butter will not go back into a solid when you put it in the refrigerator; it will stay in a creamy state.

I am told you can do the same thing with margarine, but I haven’t tried it.

170 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for this great information!

    Shannon

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  2. I shared your web site with my Relief Society sisters. Your presentation is wonderful! Thanks for sharing.

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  3. My cousin makes this... but shakes the butter a few times as it cools. When it is finished, it is nicely blended, the consistency of soft margarine or butter from a tub, no mixing needed, great for spreading on toast just as it is. She now cans all her butter and rotates it into her years supply.

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    1. I am so glad you posted this info KathyT! I have been wondering if the shaking would mix it back together. Great ifno!

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    2. Will shaking this hinder the sealing of the lids?

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    3. Wait till lids seal before shaking

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  4. This is so wonderful I am adding it to my blog! Thanks so much for making Food Storage Bearable!♥

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  5. Wow that's amazing, thanks for sharing.
    Pam

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  6. If you don't mix it back in, does it separate into ghee? I thought that's how you make ghee, in the oven.

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    1. Yes, it is technically Ghee since the buttermilk is seperated. You can keep it and use it for recipes. It will also keep longer once open :)

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    2. also put a marble in before you seal it that will help mix the fats back in

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  7. That is so amazing! Thank you so much!
    Sandra

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  8. Really great idea! Thanks for the trouble you went through to share this! =)

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  9. This is very, very unsafe. Link has comments from the USDA and the National Center for Home Food Preservation on why: http://everydayfoodstorage.net/2009/05/31/my-opinion-on-powdered-butter-and-home-canned-butter/food-storage-recipes

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    1. Christina, when butter goes off it smells.
      So if your butter has a smell that isn't the normal smell of butter DON'T eat it!

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    2. Actually, botulism has no odor or taste, so you won't know if your butter is unsafe until you end up in the hospital.

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    3. Thank You Christine for posting this fact. People need to educate themselves before doing any food preservation, plenty of accredited sites out there.

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    4. For years official sources gave directions in a pamphlet/cookbook on how to preserve butter. It wasn't until recently that this went out of practice

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    5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    6. You are right Jamie! I have several old publications that give instructions how to can things like butter and other things that is now claimed to be unsafe.

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    7. My friend has done this for years! Thanks for the great post/instructions. Now off to buy butter!

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    8. In the linK it does say "my opinion" so does that mean that it's scientific proof (fact) or someone's view?

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    9. In the linK it does say "my opinion" so does that mean that it's scientific proof (fact) or someone's view?

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    10. I read a blog that says that some of the things that are now considered 'unsafe' to can by the USDA is because they don't have the funding to properly test recipes anymore. So, if they receive any reports of sickness they remove the recommendations. My personal opinion is that if I know where my butter is coming from or I feel it is a reliable source, I will can it. Having said that, I have a freezer with a good stash of good quality organic butter. I think it's time to experiment a bit. Thank you for this post!

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    11. My understanding is that Botulism is a bacteria that must be present before canning. It can't mysteriously appear in a canned, sealed jar, so the real issue might be sanitation. If a seal breaks, then reseals, botulism can get in, but, and this is my opinion, if everything is sterile and proper procedures are followed, then botulism shouldn't be an issue, unless stored in a warm environment where a seal may break then reseal itself. Isn't that why we don't store them with the screw tops on, though?

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    12. My understanding is that Botulism is a bacteria that must be present before canning. It can't mysteriously appear in a canned, sealed jar, so the real issue might be sanitation. If a seal breaks, then reseals, botulism can get in, but, and this is my opinion, if everything is sterile and proper procedures are followed, then botulism shouldn't be an issue, unless stored in a warm environment where a seal may break then reseal itself. Isn't that why we don't store them with the screw tops on, though?

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    13. The problem is that butter is not acidic. Canning items with methods other than high temp and high pressure, when the product is low in acid, is very dangerous. Especially if you are doing things like relying on the sanitizing cycle of your dishwasher. I would not risk it.

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    14. Smoking used to be considered safe as well, but with advancements in technology and science, we now know it is not. The same is true with canning.

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    15. According to Wikipedia,(https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botulism)
      Botulism can be killed by heating the items to 185 degrees Fahrenheit for more than 5 minutes. This method requires 225 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes. That's more than long enough to kill off any botulism that may be in the butter.

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    16. According to Wikipedia,(https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botulism)
      Botulism can be killed by heating the items to 185 degrees Fahrenheit for more than 5 minutes. This method requires 225 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes. That's more than long enough to kill off any botulism that may be in the butter.

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    17. Excellent point, GZ, except for one thing. Not all oven thermostats are reliable. Cheaper thermostats will cause a wider "swing" in temperatures, etc. Make sure you use an oven thermometer to be sure your oven is getting up to temp. The key to all of this is to make sure the contents are getting heated to a sufficient temperature as to kill any organisms that might otherwise feast on your food. Failure to kill them all could be deadly. Also, Botulism isn't the only issue. There are other organisms that might survive a low acid environment, like butter, and cause your batch to go bad. Personally, I would up the temp and time just a little, especially if I had an older or cheaper oven.

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    18. The reason you don't find recipes with a lot of oil or other fats is because the fat will insulate the botulism spores from the heat of canning.

      Oven canning and canning dry goods is not safe because for thorough heat penetration of the items to be canned, they must be immersed in either boiling water or steam (pressure canning) and if you're not pressure canning, you have to have an appropriate acidity level.

      Canning is not something to mess around with if you don't know what you're doing. It's a science and if you don't respect it it can kill you or your loved ones. Please, do your research and don't can with a procedure or ingredient just because it looks "neat" or just to spite those that are saying they know otherwise. It's just not worth the risk.

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    19. GOOD GRIEF HOW EVER DID THE HUMAN RACE SURVIVE WITHOUT SOME GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT TO TELL US HOW TO DO THINGS ! Recipe's have been handed down for generations with no ill effects.Bottling is the best way to preserve almost anything as long as everything is sterilised ,don't know anyone who has had a problem.

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    20. In our grandparents time we did not have the modified animals and animal feed or the toxic additives in our environment (air, water, earth) either. Also people died of so many unknown issues that an accurate count on food related deaths is unlikely. The variables are many including heavier pots or canners that held temp better than the thin ones used today. Quality of equipment has reduced over time. Now some of our traditional preservation tools, salts and sugars, are a health concern and we reduce their usage to the point of not doing the job as a preservative. Many of you are likely to do that with this recipe, choosing unsalted butter, lowering what little preservation qualities the butter has. Our skills are not what our grandmothers or G. grandmothers had. We dont know all the reasons behind the methodology they used. My own great grandmother packed salted cooked meats, layered with animal fat (lard), in clay crocks and stored it in the celler all winter long. They buried bushels of apples deeply in a hay lined pit covered over with hay and an oiled tarp so they had unfrozen fruit all winter. She had sixteen children and not all survived. Who knows if they lost 5 of those children to food related issues? So since 11 survived do we exclude improperly preserved food as an issue? All the 'safety' commenters are saying is why risk it? The elderly and youngest are more suceptable to bacteria and viruses so what gives you gas may put them in the hospital struggling to breath or worse. We have safer methods so why not use them? Why risk those you love? Maybe you should just gift your first batches and see what happens (just joking). Its worth thinking about.

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  10. This is not considered safe by the USDA. Dairy products are never considered safe for canning.

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    1. really so condensed and evaporated milk isn't safe....

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    2. There is a VAST difference between what is possible by commercial canneries and what the home cook can achieve. Canned milk from a store is safe because they can do it in a safe way. It is not possible for the home cook. AND - far beyond that, oven canning is NEVER recommended.

      As far as the older publications saying that it was OK (comments above) - science changes. We know more now about bacteria than we ever did then. I am a home canner but would never put my family at risk by doing this.

      Just this year there was a death of someone from eating home canned food that was processed incorrectly. These days, we can connect the cause of illness to the foods - back in the old days... my guess is that folks got sick a lot more from this sort of thing than anyone ever realized.

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    3. I think you'd reconsider your trust of commercial channels if you went to an actual processing plant. They are rarely pristine as is "required" for those who do the same process at home....

      Why do you think certain amounts of insect parts, rodent hair, mammalian excreta, mold, larvae, etc is allowed in commercially prepared food?

      Just Google the FDA defect level handbook and glance through the list....


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    4. I believe the USA also claims raw milk is "dangerous" yet neither I nor any of my friends who drink it have ever gotten sick from it. In fact, the only times I have gotten sick from food was from eating ín a USDA approved and inspected restaurant. Go figure.

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  11. Have been doing it - loving it. My mother in law just opened one of her jars from a few years ago - fantastic!

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  12. Thanks for the link, this is hugely useful, and I'm excited to get mine cooled and finished!!

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  13. Wouldn't it perhaps be easier just to melt your butter all at the same time in a pot and then ladle it into jars with a funnel to keep them clean? Seems like that might cut out at least two steps for you.

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    1. Except then you have no way to ensure the right ratio of butter solids to ghee.

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    2. There would also be more opportunity to slop the liquid butter on the rims and down the sides - lots more cleanup work as well as the possibility of not getting the rims cleaned sufficiently for a safe seal. I'll stick to this way - lots less work.

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    3. I agree with Judith. This way you have exact measurements and no fatty, buttery cleanup afterwards. Plus the advantage of heating the fats twice play into my comfort level of canning dairy. Came across a canning recipe for creamed cheese the other day. Can't wait to try both of these.

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  14. I know this sounds super great, but "canning" butter can lead to botulism, the silent killer. It is better to freeze your butter, and instead of canning butter, can beans which you can use in place of butter in many recipes.

    I realize that maybe I seem lame, but I really want you and your readers to be safe!

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    1. You better be using a pressure canner with your beans...

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  15. Butter left too long in the freezer can go rancid. I found that out the hard way. I will try this as it will be convienently soft when making cookies.

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  16. Do you leave it on the shelf (for years) or do you refrigerate it(for years) when it is done?

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  17. Thanks for the tip!! never thought that butter could be bottled. now I have to try this!!

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    1. Anything CAN be bottled/canned, but not everything SHOULD be. Butter being one of those things. It's not proven safe for canning.

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  18. I agree with the comments above. This method is unsafe, however there are safe methods for canning butter that involve pressure cooking it. This will kill any bacteria including Clostridium botulinum

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    1. Can you give a link of how to do it that way, the safe way?
      Thanks,
      Kate

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    2. I'm sorry, Kate. There is no safe way to "can" butter. See the information here: http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#33

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    3. A lot of farmers are going back to the old way and selling raw milk. It wasn't until they wanted it to keep longer they started the pasteurization process. I think you could safely pressure cook this.The secret to canning is being clean about everything. FYI, they sell canned butter around the world. Wonder how they do that?

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    4. For people who are preceding with this method good luck...you may or may not be here tomorrow. Commercial equipment is designed to can products like condensed milk. They can goods at higher temperatures than home canning equipment can reach. They're required to do a 3 second 250 degree heat to kill all the bot organisms. Home canning equipment, including pressure canners don't always kill everything so obv. safe and clean practice is a must but, close attention for any spoilage thereafter is also a must. You naysayers and people mocking the proper preservation of food are fools who've obviously never cracked a book on the art of safe home canning. Good luck with that. By the way...getting botulism would be pretty horrible way to go. Is improperly "home canned butter" worth the risk of getting you or your loved ones deathly ill? When in doubt....throw it out.

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    5. My mother in law was an avid canner. She canned every veg. and fruit imaginable. Beef , chicken and fish were among her specialty items. Everything was done in a regular water bath. No one ever got sick. After practicing this method for all of her married life she left us at age 89.

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    6. Just because "no one every got sick" doesn't mean no one ever will. Smoking used to be considered safe, too, but with advancements in technology and science, we now know that it isn't. The same is true with canning. But, hey, your family, your risk.

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  19. Canning butter is unsafe, especially when done in the oven. You would be better off to make ghee

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  20. I have never heard of anyone getting botulism from doing this, my friends have done it. The above comments seem like it's worked well for them as well. Since the gov't says there are only 110 case each year of botulism in this whole huge country, it doesn't seem like such a risky notion. I'm going to try it. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001624/

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    1. If you or your family become one of the 110 cases, I imagine you will feel differently. Even with immediate treatment, there are likely to be long-term neurological problems, and the young, elderly or immuno-compromised are likely to die.Why would you even want to risk this for your family or friends? What can you gain from canning butter and keeping it for three years that is worth the risk of death?

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    2. The "it hasn't killed me yet" syndrome

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  21. why would you post something that new canners can see when you have proof of how unsafe this is...I don't understand you...post something safe for them to can...risking safety possibly a life...for what?? buy the powdered if worried about long term storage...110 is 110 too many...

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    1. It is not the OP's responsibility to think for her readers. Individuals must take the initiative to investigate safety issues and concerns THEMSELVES before trying something new. If she uses this method and it works for her, great. If you don't think it's safe after having researched it, don't use the method. Don't bash her for not treating her readers like idiots that can't do a little research. Also, botulism is actually a very rare condition. 110/yr out of a 300 million plus population only gives you about a 0.000035041440006952225% of contracting the illness.

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    2. PrepareForAll, I agree with you. Considering there are millions of food born illnesses a year (yes I said millions) and rough 1200, not including this type, that caused deaths in 2011 alone, I think we have more serious cases to worry about. In fact, did you know that 330 deaths were caused by Toxoplasma gondii in 2011. Did you also know that the most common way to contract this is thru a cat? Does this mean you would get rid of your cat because the numbers are triple that of the other food born illness? If so, no one would ever have a cat again. Did you also know that most people who have food poisoning don't even know they have it because they think they have the flu? So the next time someone has the flu, ask yourself 'what did I eat today?"

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    3. So many Worry Wandas out there. My grandmother canned butter from our cows and never had a single case of anyone becoming ill. She passed at 101. If you follow all sanitation procedures and have your oven hot enough bacteria wont survive. Concerned about the 225degF, boost it to 250degF. Then the its the same as pressure canning. 250-260degF. I have friends and myself who have followed this method for years and at 67 years old, haven't had a problem yet.
      Chef W. Luke, Certified Exec. Chef, Certified Sanitation & Safety Manager

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    4. If you want to eat your "canned" butter, you can, but dry heating jars for 45 minutes is not going to kill bacteria. Dry heating and pressure canning are not the same thing. Even if you used a pressure canner it is not the same.
      Don't blow people off as "worry Wandas", as an Exec. Chef (if you really are) then you should know about food safety procedures and this is not a food safe process. Please refer to National Center for Home Canning FAQ page if you want to dismiss more people as "Worry Wandas".
      You can do this, but the method used is not food safe and you could end up with rancid butter that will make you very sick.
      National Center for Home Canning Advises: "In conclusion, with no testing having been conducted to validate these methods, we would NOT recommend or endorse them as a safe home-canning process, let alone for storing butter at room temperature for an extended period. We do know that the methods given for preheating empty jars, or even filled jars, in a dry oven are not recommended by the jar manufacturers or by us for any food. Aside from the physical safety and quality issues, and the fact that it is not canning at all, if there happened to be spores of certain bacteria in there, these procedures will not destroy those spores for safe room temperature storage."
      http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html

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    5. Please carefully read what you posted. The USDA via NCHFP states the method is unsafe even though they have not tested it. ("...with no testing having been conducted to validate these methods,...") I hope that you understand that they do not have the funding, nor the manpower to test all tools, methods, and recipes.

      That being said, I personally would not attempt this unless I was pressure canning the butter (which I have seen a youtube video or two about).

      Be educated!

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    6. You say that people should be responsible and research for themselves yet in one of the commens it said that it was being taught/shared in a Relief Society meeting....THAT is being irresponsible. The liabilty that could be placed upon the Church if someone gets sick is a real concern. ONLY safe canning methods should be shared. There are NO approved methods to can butter or cheese of other dairy products.

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  22. very unsafe... just because nobody you know has died of botulism doesn't mean it wont happen to you. A few years ago, near where I live, an older woman killed her whole family with botulism using unsafe canning methods she had been doing her whole life. So I'd rather run to the store to get more butter than risk lives, but hey that's just me!

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    1. One more thing to note, the temperature to kill botulism spores is 250 degrees F so if you are going to do this at least get it up to 250 or use a pressure canner

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    2. What are you going to do when the stores are empty and the power fails to keep the freezer going. Eat it all immediately or can it @ 250degF. It also comes down to common since and good sanitation practices. I put my empty jars in the oven for 15-minutes to sterilize them before ever putting product into them.

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    3. I think you'll find that the major manufacturers of canning jars all recommend against heating their jars in the oven or baking in them. Again, you're taking a risk, and why would you want to risk permanent neurological damage or even death to your family members and friends who eat with you?

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    4. Um, a 15 minute process even at 250 will NOT sterilize anything. You need pressure as well. Where do you guys get this information?

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    5. Better re-read that info. The cooking process is one hour, not 15 min. Perhaps that is the link to unsafe canning practices...some people don't read very well. As far as people getting sick from home canned things, who's to say that that is what made them sick. You hear on the news about food items being recalled because of a threat of unsafe elements all the time. How would anyone determine it to be any one thing unless several people got sick at the same time ? Then a trace can be made back to the source.

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    6. Granny asked what do you do when the stores are empty and the power fails. In my case, I would just not have butter. I will survive without it and I would NEVER take a chance of giving canned butter to my grandchildren based on all the scientific recommendations. To those who are fine with it - do as you please, but I value my grandchildren's lives too much to take a chance. And to those of you who state that there aren't enough testing funds to test everything, you're welcome to be the testers. Just remember that the testing centers follow priorities to use their funds prudently.

      Nana to 6 precious grandchildren

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  23. Since your buying all that butter at once to melt, wouldnt it be more economical and safer to just buy the butter when you need it?

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  24. eh, no need to do this with margarine. This is awesome, it should last a long time - but in my house wouldn't ever. I might need to do this, as I buy butter fresh and freeze it. Although, I do love the cold butter solid from the fridge, so I think I wouldn't do everything.

    Essentially you are putting the butter through the clarifying process without actually clarifying it.

    If you look up instructions for making ghee, you'll find them very similar.

    Nice!

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  25. ....and not everyone lives near the farm to get fresh butter. We buy online most of the time to get what we need fresh, and to get it 'on sale' and not have freezer space, THIS will be a great asset to have in my recipe box. Awesome.

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  26. This is so absolutely WONDERFUL! What a great way to take advantage of an excellent sale on butter, and prep in case of hard times! Thank You so very much! The Photos are extremely helpful! Kudo's to the Photographer!

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  27. Quoting government is really lame since each year many more children (and adults) die or have serious side effects from government vaccines. Food spoiliage happens from NEW methods too and the guidelines are "recommendations"
    Our own government appointed a former Monsanto CEO to our FDA and we're suppose to trust what's going in our food? Most cases of canning illinesses are not from the method but a dirty or unsterile work area. I do agree with raising the heat slightly. Put the illinesses in perspective. You are probably more likely to die in your car, run over by a car, die in a plane, be mugged, robbed or some other horrible fate than die from canning.

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    1. THANK YOU. There are some level headed individuals out there. LOVE IT, LOVE IT, LOVE IT.

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    2. And can't t forget fluoride that the government claims is "safe" too ...

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  28. Unsure if this is safe or not, but I wouldn't use this for baking unless it calls for melted butter.

    The physical properties of butter are changed when melted and prevent butter from being mixed properly with the flour in the cookie dough. Butter that has been melted coats the flour in the dough differently than softened butter. Therefore, soften a new stick of butter to use for cookie dough.

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  29. Red feather makes NZ canned butter. I think that would be safer and great for food storage.

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  30. hi there, this sounds great, have you actually tried it to see if it's as good as it sounds? thanks

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  31. Ok, this isn't "approved" by the USDA or the food gods. I can butter. However, I wouldn't can it in the oven as stated here.

    First off, everthin has to be sterilized, as clean as you can get it. Melt your butter in the jars in a pan of boiling water (sterilized jars) then lid an process in a pressure canner. Your pressure will depend on your altitude. Mine is 10 pounds for 60 minutes.

    After you remove from the canner I let them sit and cool. After they start to "set" I begin to shake them from time to time an get the solids an liquids mixed back together. After they completly cool it is nearly the same texture as the butter was originally. It will be just a touch "grainey".

    Will store 3 to 5 years on the shelf in a cool dark place.

    Every thing "must" be sterile as butter has a large amount of fat in it and makes a great base for bacteria to grow.

    Life is full of choices, you have to make them for yourself. Is canning butter safe? Done properly I beleive so. Buying food at the store has risk associated with it. It really depends on the risk you wan't to take. In my book, the risk is very small.

    Also, besure to use salted butter. Refrigerate after opening your stored butter.

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    1. If you didn't put your jars/lids in an autoclave, they aren't sterile. And yes, butter has everything in it that would make for a veritable bacteria Disneyland.
      Eat your canned butter if you want. Personally I will add this to "List of Horrible Ideas from the Internet".
      The only good thing is that if the butter goes rancid, it will smell so horrible that most people probably won't eat it anyways.

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    2. Actually, a pressure cooker/canner IS used as an autoclave. I have one that came with all the necessary stuff to use to autoclave medical supplies. It was Army issue and brand new in the box when I bought it. It pressure cans 22 quart bottles at a time. If I were to can butter, I would only pressure process it, similar to canning meat. Oven canning is not reliable.

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    3. Actually NO. No dairy can be canned safely unless you have a canner that reaches two atmospheres of pressure. OMG. Do your research. Since like 1989 The USDA has said canning it in a pressure canner or water bath is not enough to kill bacteria.

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  32. Ok, I am a person who actually tried this a few years ago. I was wary of this. I didn't even eat it for a little more than a year after canning. I stored them in a dark cabinet in the very back. Eventually, I opened a jar and tried some. Eating a small amount spread on something, I felt sick for a while, but no vomiting. A while later, another jar, I spread a much larger amount on toast and I was sick, food poisoning, for about 24 hours. However, I used contents from those same jars in cooking. When it was heated in cooking, such as sauteeing onions for the base of a soup or something, there were no problems with illness. I did not give any to my kids or husband (thankfully), except a few times where it was cooked. Also, I can every year tomatoes, peaches, etc, and I have never had food poisoning from anything else I have ever canned. So, I won't say it can't be done. But be careful. It might be better to just buy large containers of ghee that are commercially prepared for food storage. I canned about eight jars of butter, and I used two in the above mentioned experimenting. After being sick though I really got turned off from eating anymore of the butter and I threw out the remaining six jars which was a big waste.

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  33. My UT state extension office does not recommend canning butter. I don't think taking a chance on something that can kill you is a good idea (especially if you can't see or smell it) and you are feeding it to your family. You wouldn't stop wearing seat belts because there is only a slight chance you will get in a car crash and die...it is always best to be extra cautious when it comes to canning. Only go with approved and tested canning recipes from the Ball book or your state extension office. Just because it didn't kill your Granny doesn't mean it's safe. And teaching other people who don't know it is questionable to do is irresponsible!

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  34. I don't know what is more funny... that people actually trust the USDA or that people actually thing store bought butter is actually safer.

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  35. OMG people!!! Seriously, I cannot believe what I am reading. If you do not like what she wrote then just don't try it. Stop acting like a bunches of azzes. If you do not agree, fine. Better yet, just move on but stop bashing the poor girl for a post. You have eyes so take your butts, read up on it and if you do not like, then move on. Grow the hell up already!!!

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    1. "Grow the hell up already!!!" This from someone who starts their comment with, "OMG people!!!" Was there a sale on exclamation points? Also, where do you want us to take our butts?

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    2. Personally, I think y'all should just switch to olive oil. It stores nicely, tastes delicious, and is good for you. My 2 cents.

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    3. I didn't read all the comments, but of the ones I read no one was 'bashing' the author of this blog. I think most people are just generally concerned for their fellow humans, and want them to proceed with caution if they decide to use this method of storage.

      A basic knowledge of dairy products will make anyone apprehensive when it is suggested those products can be subjected to heat, and stored at room temperature.

      In the end, there really was no need for you to lose your cool. After all, if Ms. Tronier didn't expect comments she would have (or should have) disabled this feature on her blog.

      Much peace to you and yours. :-)

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    4. If you don't like this site get off of it. You people say the rudest thing. Im sure you would have the balls to say it to his face. You hide behind the internet, what hero's..be nice or don't post...

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    5. Thank you. Everyone wants to bash.

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  36. More people have died buying meat and/or vegetables at Wal-Mart. There is risk in everything we do. Walking into a bank is a risk. No where does thid say, "I guarentee by doing this you will be from all home canning risks". Where is the statistics on people who have burned themselves? Uuh oh, there's the risk. Don't do it. How many jars have broken. Whoops! That is unsafe, wrap ourselves in bubblewrap. Just use all probable safety procautions in all we do. We die in Gods time. Not ours.

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  37. I just have to weigh in on this and say...

    #1 Just because people have done this before and didn't die doesn't mean that you won't.

    #2 The food preservation experts are testing these methods out at land grant universities, and although they are technically 'gov. employees', they got their jobs through their expertise and and an interview, rather than an election or appointment by an elected official.

    #3 I'm not going to bash the lady for posting this, and yes, folks should do their own research...but I think it is irresponsible to post this when there is so much research that shows this is not a safe method. Sorry...I've been canning and preserving for many years, and I always use the most up to date methods available...because I don't want to kill my family.

    #4 If you really want to prepare for the apocalypse...you need to move out to the country and get yourself some cows or goats.

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  38. Why would anyone want to do this?

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  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  40. Do it...or don't do it that is the awesome part about being human!....jeeez

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    1. If you're the only one who's going to eat the finished product, I say your reasoning is fine. However, if you're going to serve it to your family and friends, then you're making a very risky decision on their behalf that I don't think, morally or ethically, you have any right to make. Just my opinion.

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  41. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Reposting my comment,..........Found the article very interesting and then slowly disturbing with serious info and concerns on canning dairy products. Freezing with air tight vacuum sealors sounds like a better and safer way to go, and to avoid freezer burn as well. I faithfully do the boiling water bath for 20 minute or wont can if I cant do this process. And I only can food that will taste better without preservatives, is cheaper to put up for three seasons, and for Christmas gifts too. I shop at Bottom Dollar and can get butter for $1.50 to $2 for box of butter and no need to stock up like the world is coming to an end. Im 72 and never saw the stores out of anything other then snow shovels and rock salt for sidewalks in winter time. I just would not forgive myself if I made someone very sick or died over the price of butter. BTW,..everyone has the right to have their say as long as respectful. This was very helpful in my decision not to do with having so many different view points.

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  42. You can buy canned butter for storage. : )

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  43. This should ONLY be done in a pressure canner. I have done it that way and it turned out great. Food SAFETY first.

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  44. This isn't safe. You shouldn't can dairy products AND using an oven isn't a safe canning method. Botulism doesn't have a smell so you wouldn't know if it was unsafe. Even if you've never gotten sick from it before, you're playing russian roulette with your health when consuming this.

    Very bad idea.. Very bad..

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  45. Please consider your family's health before proceeding with this method of butter storage: Read http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html

    I like an earlier commenter's suggestion about using beans as an alternative to butter in a pinch. Anything is better than C. botulinum!

    Stay safe people.

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  46. The usda tells us it's not safe...they also tell us they didn't test it yet! It is considered safe in many other counties in Europe. You think they are stupid in Europe or Australia?

    The usda also tells us that drinking mountain dew is safe..even some ingredients are prohibited in many
    countries..there are many more foods out there that have so many bad ingredients in them, and the usda didn't do anything..and this same usda we trust if they say it MAYBE unsafe????? Seriously...

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  47. Ummm.....how about just buying coconut oil in large quantities and storing that? It will last for years, no risks and can be used for everything butter can be, especially good for dairy sensitivities!

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  48. I have found that, after the jars have sealed and are cool enough to handle, if you shake them for about one minute, every 10 - 15 minutes, the butter will return to it's pre-melted consistency.

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  49. Oh dear. I can't say this is safe.

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  50. My mother in law canned with o it a pressurized e cooker as did her mother and so on. We canned tomatoes by filling the jar adding tsp salt filled with water , added lids and rings, boiled for four hours and took them out turned upside down too ensure sealed and they were delicious.

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  51. Uhm...I understand both sides of this. But FEAR is what drives people to say it is unsafe. When someone tells you they cannot recommend something because they haven't tested it...it's because they don't want to be SUED! Plain and simple. And shall I point out the obvious.....it hasn't been tested.
    Nothing is completely safe as some others have said. And you are responsible for yourself. There are no guarantees folks. Nobody gets out of this alive.
    For the folks who said things like just buy canned butter or why do this...move on to another blog. You don't get it, you never will. Good luck to you skippy.

    Such a society we live in. So sad.

    To the blog owner/writer: take heart, chin up, carry on. People are idiots. You did a fine job. I wonder if those that profess that pressure canning is the answer realize that pressure canning came out almost 50 or more years after canning was already a well used home method of food preservation. You should look at what people did before canning. They stored food in buckets of lard or air dried it or hung it over smoke....or pickled it.
    I hope this experience didn't take too much out of you. I know it was a few years ago that you posted this.
    Best of luck to you.
    Pam Baker

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  52. Um--If ya'all are set on storing butter over time--you do know you can do this in ceramic crocks; right? AS long as it is somewhere it won't get WARM enough to spoil--say in a deep root cellar or a spring room--which in my opinion any of you "Preppers" really ought to be building RIGHT NOW---you can pack your days production of butter--you DO know how to churn butter---right?---you can use the Mason jars FOR that BTW---let the kiddos do it---and then pack SALT between the layers and cover with something impermeable--they used to use oil cloth. There are LOTS of ways to preserve things safely--but in the long run if you really want to save things that are by their nature perishable--you are going to have to weigh the consequences. To actually make ghee is not that hard---it does take TIME and CAREFUL WATCHING--but it is not hard and that --because you ARE removing the butter solids--will keep. AND--I always wonder--how LONG do you think you are going to hold out on stored food? I know that some people have stocks built according to some religious formula; which is fine; but in the REAL world---without some means of PRODUCING these things or TRADING for them---you are gonna run out fast! And even a few years worth could be--fast. And--making butter out of goats milk--it can be done--I have done it--but it is a PITA--much better to have something like a milking shorthorn cow or a Jersey. Obviously people survived over the centuries on stored food--but the Spring used to be called The Starving Time for a reason--until you have established crops to be harvested---there is not much LEFT to eat. I don't mean to bash at all--just some one who has done some of this and whose grandma and great grandma taught me a few things---

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  53. Anyone else remember ECOLI? The FDA AND USDA have allowed farmers to feed our cows corn because it's cheaper. Now what's wrong with this you say? Nothing but the fact that cows cannot digest corn properly which is why when grazing and given the choice they eat grass. So what happens when you feed cows corn? Their bodies reject it and a virus forms in their stomach. What's this virus called? ECOLI. Why were people getting sick and contracting Ecoli from eating spinach? Because cow dung is used in fertilizers....which carried the virus which lived in cows' stomachs from being fed corn....thaaaaat was approved by the USDA and FDA....the same organizations which regulates the foods we eat in this country.

    This blogger posted something she discovered and found useful. If you are afraid to use this method than don't do it. If you find it unsafe than don't do it. However do not go to her site and bash her. For those of you that are nervous about contracting botulism, I say to you unless you purchase organic, locally grown produce and grass fed beef, take into consideration that you are more likely going to get ill from consuming pesticides than you are from botulism.

    *steps down from soap box*

    Do your own research, use your head and leave this blogger alone...she's an awesome site!

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    1. e coli is a bacteria. I'm not saying e coli isn't dangerous or that cows should eat corn instead of grass. But if you'd like your "soap box" to have any shred of credibility you should get your facts straight. e coli is a bacteria. Do your research.

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    2. Also- e coli lives in the intestine, not the stomach.

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  54. If you're going to be a canning rebel and can butter, at least take into account the fact that it's a low acid protein food and should be pressure canned.

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  55. Thanks for the tip about the salt.

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  56. CAN NEVER ARGUE WITH FREEZING! all this rigmarole is unnecessary when you can simply freeze!

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  57. Lots of controversy. Yikes! I think I shall try it!

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  58. Lots of controversy. Yikes! I think I shall try it!

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  59. Really?? What a lot of work. I just put my butter in the freezer. No melting, no canning, no jars, and it stays in the form of a 'stick of butter'!!

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  60. For those claiming the National Center for Home Food Preservation says don't do this, please list your reference to the facts as to why - not a link to an opinion piece.

    In the NCfHFP's FAQs, yes, they don't recommend preserving butter, but more so as it is not economically feasible, and other speculated possibilities exist. No where have I read have they stated to flat out not store butter in this manner. Is there a risk? I would say yes, but there is a risk in everything related to food storage.

    Now, thinking about this even deeper - the Dairy Lobbyists fight really hard to not have diary products stored, as they want their fresh products sold quickly, and on demand. If a surplus were to ever exist, market prices would fall. Unless you get it on sale, milk sells between $4-$7/gallon now, depending on where you live, whereas just a few years ago, you could get it more between $1.50-$3/gallon. Cheese prices have also jumped in the past 5 years. Eggs, which also sell as "dairy", are also on the increase. Anyway to make these items "just in time for consumption" bodes better for the wholesaler and retailer than it does for the consumer.

    Do what ever you feel is right for you. If you want to try something that is now considered unconventional, which in the past for decades was used as normal storage practices (refrigeration has not been around that long), go for it. Try a small batch and see how it goes. If you find success, then ramp it up to larger quantities. Just like with financial planning. diversify your methods of storage across various platforms (freeze dried, dehydrated, refrigerated, frozen, dry-heat processed, water bath and pressure canning). If you don't want to take any risks, well, don't do it. The choice is yours.

    http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#33

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    1. The USDA and all scientists are who says. Google it. You will see. And if you haven't gotten sick then go buy a lottery ticket because you are damn lucky and stupid.

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  61. DON'T DO THIS! You can get food poisoning and possibly die! This is NOT CANNING AND IT IS NOT SAFE! There is not enough acid to kill off the bacteria in the butter and just melting the butter is not a high enough temp to kill the bacteria either! Butter is not recommended in a pressure canner either. If you must stockpile butter the best way is in a deep freezer you can keep it for as long as 6 months I have done that for years now. Or if you are looking to dry store you can buy the #10 can of dehydrated butter that will keep for 25 years unopened. I have some family that have those in long storage and honesty the price you pay for it now would be worth it is SHTF wouldn't you want to keep your family safe and not chance killing them or making them very ill? Isn't your family at least worth that much?

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  62. how do you store ? in the fridge or on a shelf?

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  63. Canning anything is safe if you do it safely. For instance, I would not touch the butter with your fingers. Use tongs or something. Never touch any part of food, jars or lids with fingers. Rings only on the putside. Then no bacteria can get into the jar or on the food.

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    1. Unknown, your statement is not true. Safety actually has more to do with the temperature inside the jar and the properties of the specific food. Also sterilizing everything before processing is simply not necessary with pressure canning because the canning process itself does the sterilizing. Even Ball, who makes most of the lids used today, has stated that you no longer need to even warm the lids, much less sterilize them. Just take them out of the box and put them on the jars. The canner will do the sterilizing. Also, I'm not sure that you know this, but bacteria also floats in the air so it's not possible to keep all bacteria out. Once again, canning at the right temperature and for the proper length of time (and the right pressure if pressure canning) is what kills the bacteria for safe canning.

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  64. Canning butter is NOT safe, most especially if done in an oven. There are no canning jars rated for safety under the uneven conditions in an oven. NOT a good idea.

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  65. Personally I wouldn't take this risk. That said why don't you go to the store and just buy commercially canned ghee? I know it is a little different or might not be good on toast but ghee is just clarified butter...actually better for pan frying or sauteing than whole butter because it doesn't burn.

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  66. For those who think what is made by the big companies is always safe should think again. As one of those who got food poisoning from a commercial can of fruit, I can tell you I would rather eat home canned any day.

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  67. I hope you all stay clear of her butter. This is NOT safe according to every scientist and the USDA. You can NOT can butter in a water bath or pressure canner. Clostridium botulinum is a very deadly bacteria that is colorless and odorless. ONLY can food that has been tested safe by the USDA. If you've never gotten sick, go buy a lottery ticket. They have food scientists that test recipes all day long to make sure they are safe for home canning. ONE of them that they have already tested DAIRY. Dont can it. All you have to do is google it and there will be several hundred websites warning against canning dairy, flour, squash and some others..etc. Please, please, follow the rules. Canning is a science that can kill you if not done correctly. NOT an art.

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  68. I don't get it. Why would you want to can butter in the first place?

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  69. ...all you "lucky" people who have been "doing this for years"...are just that...LUCKY!! It's not a matter of IF...it's a matter of WHEN. If this process is done incorrectly you could get very sick....or???

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  70. Before canning anything in the oven, you should go check out what the manufacturers of the jars say. THEY say it isn't safe to heat the jars in the oven because the dry heat compromises the glass of the jars.

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  71. Food Storage Recipes-Use these 20 Minute food storage meals recipes to rotate your food meal storage and introduce your family to the meals they would like to eat.

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  72. I just did 12 jars..and then read everyone's comments. I want to thank the writer for posting this. Your efforts are appreciated. However, I am now concerned. Can I freeze the jars of butter and perhaps once thawed eat within a few days. Why did I do this in the first place? We are in the country and can go suddenly for days wtih no hydro which means no fridge.

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  73. I'm going to put a revolver to my head and pull the trigger. I already pulled the trigger twice and haven't died yet. My father did the same thing with the same revolver and he didn't die. And my grandfather pulled the trigger of the same revolver once and he didn't die. That's 5 times the trigger was pulled on this revolver and nobody died. Obviously when I pull the trigger for the 6th time nothing will happen. Hey, instead of holding it to my own head, just to prove how safe it is, I'm going to point it at my daughter's head and pull the trigger for the 6th time. Bet you'll all feel dumb when nothing happens.

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  74. Food Storage Meals-Browse our webpage & find our collection of tried Mylar Food Storage Dinners meals & recipes that we have used ourselves!

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  75. I just don't understand why you would need to do this? if you want to stock up you can freeze it, this doesn't seem like it serves any purpose. Canning your home grown vegetables saves you money and allows you to know where your food came from. Canning store bought butters just means you have store bougth butter in the house.

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  76. I canned butter about 6 months ago. We are eating it with no problems, at all. Katzcradul has Utube videos on how to do it, as well as bexarprepper. There is a group on Facebook called Rebel Canner's. I also have an old antique cookbook with directions for canning milk. There are hundreds of people in this FB group that can butter successfully, as well as other off grid things.

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  77. DO NOT can butter in the oven. Giving food advice that goes against safe canning practices.......... Especially in the event of no medical help. I know that there are few outbreaks of botulism and other diseases from IMPROPER canning practices. It is because MOST people follow proper procedure. Put it in a pressure canner. Pinterest...............

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  78. Why? Butter lasts about 3-4 months in the fridge, so save yourself a LOT of time and trouble and just pick it up at the grocery store 3-4 times a year.

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  79. Not all people live close to stores or roads for that matter....but the internet still gets around. Canning butter in oven is in my opinion not a good idea..not hot enough. I use my canning pot. and its fresh butter that I can. unsalted.




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  80. I'm not worried about doing what humans have done for god knows how long before refrigeration. we used to burn oil lamps, candles and natural gas lamps for lighting back when common sense was the norm. None of these methods would be approved by our nanny government today.
    I still use a butter bell as do many Europeans and we all know the USFDA wouldn't approve of that.
    how does anyone think we made it this far without the advancements of the last 150 years?

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    1. Well said!Too many doubting thomases brain washed by the authorities into believing the only safe food is comercialy produced.And we all know who's pockets they are in. My mother and her siblings grew up in a series of rented properties, none of which had power or plumbing.My grand mother bottled everything in stoneware jars sealed with muslin and wax. i spent the first 5 years of my life in one of those properties with no ill effects. Raw milk and fresh eggs from the local farm and whatever could be grown or foraged from the wild. When all the technology goes wrong i think i'll survive.Good greif however did we survive without busy bodies telling us what to do ! brilliant post!

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  81. I wonder if it's relevant that back in the day, when this process was being printed up as safe, butter was made from soured cream. What we buy at the grocery store today is sweet cream butter. The two butters taste quite different. That said, I think I'll continue to treat butter as "short-term" food storage and keep it in the freezer. This method looks like too much work. :)

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  82. Just had to voice my opinion here. I also home can foods, but strictly follow proven procedures and techniques. Having worked a career as a food processor over 40+ years with a major national company, the average consumer most likely has no idea the food safety guidelines of the FDA and USDA that must be followed. Commercial and home canning of foods are not unlike each other, just on a vastly different scale. With that said, myself as an average home canner, regardless the skill level I possess, I cannot possibly emulate the same food safety protocols followed by commercial food canning due for the masses due to shear scale and resources. However, I can follow proven documented food safety preparations and techniques to ensure my own and others save consumption of the foods I chose to preserve. In closing, I definitely will NOT attempt this procedure.

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  83. I'm actually a bit scared for y'all. Canning dairy hasn't been proven safe.
    Always take the rings OFF sealed jars. This is Canning 101
    Ghee is NOT made in the oven.

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  84. Thank you for posting this. I do a lot of canning and I'm always researching all types & recipes.

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  85. Very dangerous. Botulism risk. The National Center for Home Food Preservation (the world's leading authority on the matter) actively warms against trying to home-can butter. http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#33

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  86. not sure what sort of oven you people use as you all talk in ancient terms so you must have ancient ovens im in australia and my oven is in celcius and can go up to 300 degree celcius thats 570 degrees in the ancient farenheight so just get a better oven and crank it up i use mine for heating specialised steel before i weld it and can easily get a 5kg piece of hardened steel up to 500 degrees farengheit is 2 hours so iff you are worried crank it up or get a new oven that can

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  87. I don't know what the big deal is. I just buy cartons of butter and stick them in the freezer in tact until I need a carton.

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  88. This is NOT a safe storage method for butter. http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#33 answers those questions.

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  89. After watching the very interesting video and then reading each and every post, I must say what a controversial issue this seems to be. Having canned all my life I have never heard of canning using an oven. For me it is not worth the risk of illness to me or others. I agree with the many posts suggesting using an alternative to canned butter. If looking for a way to store fat for an emergency, why not store oil or powdered butter (Honeyville sells some) and just keep some butter in the freezer to use. I love butter - but will choose an alternative for storing fat. Thanks for the knowledge and kudos to the photographer.

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  90. When educational and governmental research is no longer funded (& therefore suspect) by companies with the agenda to make more money by discouraging people from preparing and storing their own canned and preserved goods I will consider paying them more heed.

    If you are unsure of this, by all means don't do it but please would all the naysayers stop trying to scare off those who are new to home food preservation. I am confident in my abilities and this technique and will happily use these instructions to preserve real unadulterated butter.

    Thank you so much for the post! It is wonderful to see so many people going back to the old ways that have worked for millennia, but have been forgotten in the last many decades.

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  91. Well said Dee Cline ,my thoughts exactly , sadly many people have been brainwashed into believing home preservation isn't safe . I say the governments are in league with big business ,it's all about money.However did the human race survive this long without commercial produce full of chemicals ?

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